Unit 20: IS DRINKING A PROBLEM Pre-intermediate level 3 Daily English 1203 – Completing a Drug/Alcohol Rehabilitation Program

Unit 20: IS DRINKING A PROBLEM Pre-intermediate level 3 Daily English 1203 – Completing a Drug/Alcohol Rehabilitation Program

Source: English as a Second Language Podcast www.eslpod.com


Daily English 1203 – Completing a Drug/Alcohol Rehabilitation Program

Dialogue/Story

Slow Speed begins at: 1:47

Explanation begins at: 3:31

Normal Speed begins at: 17:26

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ESL Podcast 1203 – Completing a Drug/Alcohol Rehabilitation Program

COMPLETE TRANSCRIPT

Welcome to English as a Second Language Podcast number 1,203 – Completing a Drug/Alcohol Rehabilitation Program.

This is English as a Second Language Podcast episode 1,203. I’m your host, Dr. Jeff McQuillan, coming to you from the Center for Educational Development in beautiful Los Angeles, California.

Visit ESLPod.com – and when I say “visit,” I mean go there on your computer or phone – and take a look at our Learning Guides. These Learning Guides contain complete transcripts of everything we say. You can get in by becoming a member of ESL Podcast. We also have ESL Podcast Special Courses in Business and Daily English. Take a look at those when you’re on our website. And why not like us on Facebook. Go to facebook.com/eslpod.

This episode is a dialogue between John and Lindsay about someone who has had a problem with drugs or alcohol and wants to get better. Let’s get started.

[start of dialogue]

John: I’m glad to see you’re back and looking so healthy.

Lindsay: Thanks. Rehab wasn’t easy, but getting treatment for my addiction saved my life. I’d hit rock bottom.

John: Recovery from substance abuse isn’t easy, but I’m happy you got the help you needed.

Lindsay: I’m glad I checked into an inpatient program. I was able to detox, and I’m now getting the medication and counseling I need.

John: I thought you were done.

Lindsay: No, I’m now in their outpatient program, with a plan for staying sober so I won’t relapse.

John: And you’re staying away from temptation?

Lindsay: Absolutely. I’m only going clubbing two nights a week, instead of every night.

John: Uh, is that wise?

Lindsay: It will be a good test of my self-control.

John: That doesn’t sound…

Lindsay: [sound of a car horn] Sorry, there’s my ride. We’re checking out a new club tonight.

John: Yikes.

Category: Health + Medicine

John: Yikes. [end of dialogue]

John begins our dialogue by saying to Lindsay, “I’m glad to see you’re back and looking so healthy.” Lindsay says, “Thanks. Rehab wasn’t easy, but getting treatment for my addiction saved my life. I’d hit rock bottom.” “Rehab” (rehab) is short for “rehabilitation” (rehabilitation). And “rehab” or “rehabilitation” is a program that you go through when you have a problem, usually related to some sort of “addiction” (addiction).

An “addiction” is when you do something or use something so much that you lose control of other parts of your life. You may, for example, be addicted to alcohol, where you drink alcohol so much that you are unable to have a job or have a family. Some people try to stop having these addictions by going to a special program called “rehab.” Often, these are programs that are located in other places. You actually go and stay in a separate building or house. Lindsay has gone to rehab and she got treatment for her addiction.

“Treatment” is medical care that a doctor gives a patient, but it could also be care given by a psychologist or other counselor to help someone, in this case, break or get rid of one’s addiction to a certain drug or a certain behavior. You can be addicted to certain behaviors just as you can be addicted to certain physical substances such as alcohol or drugs. Some people are addicted to “gambling” – to going out and spending money on cards and other games to try to win more money. Notice the use of the preposition “to” – you are “addicted to” something.

Lindsay says the treatment for her addiction saved her life, meaning if she had not gotten the treatment, she might have died. She says, “I’d hit rock bottom.” “Rock bottom” is the lowest, worst point in your life or in the particular addiction that you have. “To hit rock bottom” is to be the worst you could possibly be. Some people say that people who have addictions need to hit rock bottom. They need to be at their lowest point before they can get better.

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ESL Podcast 1203 – Completing a Drug/Alcohol Rehabilitation Program

John says, “Recovery from substance abuse isn’t easy, but I’m happy you got the help you needed.” “Recovery” (recovery) is getting better from some illness or some disease or some medical problem. We also use this word “recovery” when we’re talking about the economy getting better after it has been in a very bad state or poor condition. Here, we’re talking about a person getting better – in this case, recovering from “substance (substance) abuse (abuse).” “Substance abuse” is when you use drugs or alcohol in such a way that you become addicted to them.

John says, “Recovery from substance abuse isn’t easy, but I’m happy you got the help you needed.” Lindsay says, “I’m glad I checked into an inpatient program.” “Inpatient” (inpatient) refers to a situation where you go and you stay at a hospital or a clinic for a long time, or at least overnight. In the hospital, we talk about people who are getting “inpatient treatment” and “outpatient treatment.” “Outpatient treatment” is when you go to a hospital or a clinic but then you go home at the end of the day. You don’t stay there.

Lindsay went into an “inpatient recovery program” where she went and actually slept there, stayed there for a certain period of time. Maybe it was a week or perhaps a month. Lindsay says she was able to “detox” (detox). “To detox” means to go through the process where the chemicals in your body from the alcohol or the drugs are able to leave your body and therefore no longer affect you physically.

Some people use the same term when they are trying to get rid of what they consider bad chemicals from the food they eat. But here, we’re talking about someone who has been abusing drugs or alcohol. “Detoxing” means to wait until those chemicals are out of your body, or at least that’s the general idea. She says, “I’m now getting the medication” – that is, other drugs – “and counseling I need.” “Counseling” is professional guidance from someone who is trained to help you with this particular psychological problem or this particular addiction.

John says, “I thought you were done,” meaning I thought you were finished. I thought you didn’t have to go to any more programs. Lindsay says, “No, I’m in their outpatient program.” We just defined “outpatient” (outpatient) a few seconds ago. It’s when you go and get medical treatment but you don’t stay at the clinic or hospital. You go back to your own house at the end of the day.

Lindsay says that she’s in an outpatient program, “with a plan for staying sober so I won’t relapse.” “To be sober” (sober) is to not be drunk. “To be sober” is the opposite of being drunk or being under the influence of drugs or alcohol. Lindsay

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ESL Podcast 1203 – Completing a Drug/Alcohol Rehabilitation Program

doesn’t want to “relapse” (relapse). “To relapse” means to go back to your former poor condition.

If you have cancer, for example, and you get rid of the cancer for a certain amount of time and you’re feeling better, but then the cancer comes back, we would call that a “relapse” of the cancer. The cancer returned. People who go through drug rehabilitation programs sometimes get better – they feel better – but then they “relapse.” They go back to being addicted to the chemical, the drug or alcohol, to which they were addicted before.

John says, “And you’re staying away from temptation?” “Temptation” (temptation) is something that makes you want to do something or want to have something that perhaps you shouldn’t do or have. If you are trying to lose weight and you have a big piece of chocolate cake sitting in front of you, that chocolate cake is a “temptation.” It is something that makes you want to eat the cake in this case and do something you shouldn’t do – at least, if you want to lose weight.

Temptations for a drug addict would be situations in which they could use drugs again. You want to stay away from those situations. This is common sense or used to be common sense. Everyone used to know that if you don’t want to do something, you should avoid situations where those things are present or there are temptations to do those things.

Lindsay says she’s staying away from temptations – situations that might cause her to want to drink or take drugs again. She says, “I’m only going clubbing two nights a week, instead of every night.” “To go clubbing” (clubbing) means to go to bars or nightclubs where people drink and dance. Sometimes we just use the verb “to club” instead of “to go clubbing.” Here in Los Angeles, there are lots of young men and women who go clubbing up in Hollywood, which is a neighborhood in Los Angeles where there are lots of bars and clubs – dance clubs.

When I was a younger man, I went to some clubs here in Los Angeles, but I was never very good at dancing so clubbing wasn’t a good place for me. Besides, none of the good-looking women wanted to dance with me anyway. Lindsay says she’s going clubbing two nights a week. John doesn’t think that’s a good idea. He says, “Uh, is that wise?” “Wise” (wise) means intelligent. Is that a good idea?

Lindsay says, “It will be a good test of my self-control.” “Self-control” is your ability to control your thoughts, words, and actions, especially when you are in a difficult or tempting situation. If you are sitting with your girlfriend or your wife and another beautiful woman walks by you, you must have “self-control.” You don’t

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ESL Podcast 1203 – Completing a Drug/Alcohol Rehabilitation Program

want to be looking at another woman, especially when you are with your own beautiful woman. That is an example of “self-control,” gentlemen.

Lindsay thinks that going to a club where there are other people drinking will be a good test of her self-control. She’ll be able to see whether she can really resist drinking again. John begins by saying, “That doesn’t sound . . .” He’s trying to say, “That doesn’t sound like a good idea.” But then we hear the sound of a car “horn” – that part of the car that makes a very loud noise to warn other drivers of something. Lindsay says, “Sorry, there’s my ride,” meaning there is the person who I am going to go with tonight, someone who is going to drive me somewhere.

She says, “We’re checking out a new club tonight.” “To check out” means to investigate or to go to for the first time to see if it’s any good. John ends our dialogue by saying, “Yikes” (yikes). “Yikes” is a word we use to express our surprise, usually at something bad. Sometimes we say “yikes” to be funny, but it is normally used to express your surprise or shock at something. John is surprised that Lindsay is going to this new club. He doesn’t think it’s a very good idea. It will be too much of a temptation for her with all that alcohol around her.

Now let’s listen to the dialogue, this time at a normal speed.

[start of dialogue]

John: I’m glad to see you’re back and looking so healthy.

Lindsay: Thanks. Rehab wasn’t easy, but getting treatment for my addiction saved my life. I’d hit rock bottom.

John: Recovery from substance abuse isn’t easy, but I’m happy you got the help you needed.

Lindsay: I’m glad I checked into an inpatient program. I was able to detox, and I’m now getting the medication and counseling I need.

John: I thought you were done.

Lindsay: No, I’m now in their outpatient program, with a plan for staying sober so I won’t relapse.

John: And you’re staying away from temptation?

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ESL Podcast 1203 – Completing a Drug/Alcohol Rehabilitation Program

Lindsay: Absolutely. I’m only going clubbing two nights a week, instead of every night.

John: Uh, is that wise?

Lindsay: It will be a good test of my self-control.

John: That doesn’t sound . . .

Lindsay: [sound of a car horn] Sorry, there’s my ride. We’re checking out a new club tonight.

John: Yikes.

[end of dialogue]

We want to thank our wise scriptwriter, Dr. Lucy Tse, for her wonderful script.

From Los Angeles, California, I’m Jeff McQuillan. Thank you for listening. Come back and listen to us again right here on ESL Podcast.

English as a Second Language Podcast was written and produced by Dr. Lucy Tse, hosted by Dr. Jeff McQuillan. Copyright 2016 by the Center for Educational Development.

GLOSSARY

rehab – rehabilitation; a program through which one tries to overcome a problem or get better, especially related to an addiction
* Over the holidays, the family gathered to try to figure out a way to get Aunt Patty into rehab for her addiction to pain medications.

treatment – medical care provided to a patient by one or more doctors, especially in more than a single session
* For months after the fire, Nancy was in treatment for her burns.

addiction – a condition in which one’s body needs more and more of something in order to feel good or normal
* Bo says he doesn’t have an addiction to alcohol, but his family thinks differently.

rock bottom – the lowest, worst point in one’s life, when things cannot possibly get any worse
* In 2008, the bank took their home, they had $40,000 in credit card debt, and they were unemployed. They hit rock bottom financially.

recovery – the process of getting better and getting back to the state or condition that one was in before, especially after a medical problem
* The doctors expect a full recovery, but it might take months.

substance abuse – the misuse of alcohol or other drugs that create an addiction * Our students learn about the long-term effects of substance abuse.

inpatient – with medical care provided while the patient stays in the hospital or medical facility for a period of time
* The success of any inpatient program depends on making the patients feel comfortable in their hospital room.

to detox – to go through a process in which one eliminates dangerous or toxic substances from the body, especially by avoiding tobacco, alcohol, and other drugs, and by eating and drinking healthy foods
* Clark’s New Year resolution was to detox by avoiding white sugar and white flour, and drinking fresh juice each day.

counseling – professional guidance and advice to address problems in one’s personal life
* Students who have a lot of behavioral problems will receive counseling services from the school district.

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ESL Podcast 1203 – Completing a Drug/Alcohol Rehabilitation Program

outpatient – with medical care provided while the patient lives at home and does not stay in the hospital or medical facility
* This is an outpatient knee surgery, so you will be able to go home the same day.

sober – not drunk; not under the influence of drugs or alcohol
* Darion is an alcoholic, but he has been sober for almost six years.

to relapse – to return to one’s former, poor condition after a period of time when one was healthier; to begin using alcohol or other drugs again after a period of time when one had stopped using them
* Sheila has responded well to the chemotherapy for her throat cancer, but there’s always the possibility that she might relapse.

temptation – something that makes one desire to have or do something that one should not have or do
* When Lola decided to lose weight, she got rid of all temptations in the house, like sodas and desserts.

to go clubbing – to go to bars or nightclubs where people dance and drink alcohol for enjoyment
* Before they had children, they went clubbing almost every weekend, but now, they mostly stay at home.

wise – intelligent; reflecting knowledge and judgment based on one’s experience * A wise man once said, “Every day may not be good, but there’s something good in every day.”

self-control – self-discipline; one’s ability to control one’s thoughts, words, and actions, especially in difficult or tempting situations
* The ideal job candidate will maintain self-control in a stressful environment with a lot of difficult deadlines.

car horn – the part of a car that, when pressed, makes a very loud noise, used to warn other drivers of something bad or dangerous that might happen
* Why are so many people using their car horns in the middle of the night? Don’t they realize that people are trying to sleep?

yikes – a word used to express alarm, shock, or negative surprise, sometimes used to be funny
* Yikes! I overslept. It’s already 7:50 and I’m supposed to be in the office before 8:00!

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ESL Podcast 1203 – Completing a Drug/Alcohol Rehabilitation Program

COMPREHENSION QUESTIONS

  1. What happened when Lindsay hit rock bottom? a) Her problems were at their worst.
b) She got in a car accident.
c) She ran out of money.
  2. What does Lindsay do two nights a week? a) She goes to the gym to exercise.
b) She plays for some local sports clubs.
c) She goes to nightclubs to have fun.

______________

WHAT ELSE DOES IT MEAN?

sober

The word “sober,” in this podcast, means not drunk, or not under the influence of drugs or alcohol: “The man told the police officer he was sober, but she could smell alcohol on his breath.” The phrase “to sober up “means to try to minimize the effects of the alcohol that one has consumed: “Try drinking some coffee to sober up so that you can drive home sooner.” The word “sober” can also describe someone who is very serious and spends a lot of time thinking: “Sierra is a sober woman who spends a lot of time thinking about life.” Finally, the word “sobering” describes something that makes one think seriously and possibly feel sad: “The doctor just called with some sobering news. Benjamin has a serious medical condition.”

wise

In this podcast, the word “wise” means intelligent, or reflecting knowledge and judgment based on one’s vast experience: “You were very wise to start saving for retirement at such a young age.” The phrase “to be none the wiser” means for someone to not discover a secret: “They planned a huge surprise party for Betty’s birthday, but she was none the wiser and was very surprised.” The phrase “to be wise to (something)” means to be aware of someone’s dishonest actions and not be fooled: “You can’t keep lying to your girlfriend. She’s wise to you.” Finally, a “wise guy” is an annoying person who pretends to know everything: “Geraldo is such a wise guy! He thinks he knows everything about our company, even though he started working here just a few weeks ago.”

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CULTURE NOTE

Open Container Laws

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ESL Podcast 1203 – Completing a Drug/Alcohol Rehabilitation Program

In the United States, “open container laws” “prohibit” (do not allow) people to drive a “vehicle” (automobile; car) with an “open bottle” (a bottle of alcohol that has been opened). These laws prohibit open bottles even if only the “passenger” (a person who rides in a car, but does not drive it) is drinking, without sharing it with the driver. The “intent” (what is supposed to happen, or what one hopes will happen) of the law is to reduce “drunk driving” (when people drive cars in dangerous ways because they are under the influence of alcohol and cannot think clearly).

Some open container laws also “restrict” (place limits on) drinking alcohol in public places, such as sidewalks and parks. But there are ways to make exceptions, such as getting permission to have open containers for special outdoor events in public places.

Open container laws “vary by state” (are different in each state). Some cities have gained “fame” (being known by many people) or “notoriety” (fame for a bad thing) for not having open container laws. For example, the cities of Butte, Montana; Hood River, Oregon; and Erie, Pennsylvania allow people to drink from open bottles in public areas. The cities of New Orleans, Louisiana and Savanna, Georgia also allow people to drink alcohol from open containers in public areas, but the containers have to be plastic, not glass or “aluminum” (metal). In parts of Nevada, the law is more “complex” (detailed and confusing), because people may have open containers in most public areas, but not in parking lots and not near the store where the alcohol was “purchased” (bought).

______________

Comprehension Questions Correct Answers: 1 – a; 2 – c

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